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Science education

Science education

Strengthening engagements between schools and the science community

Author(s): 
Rachel Bolstad & Ally Bull with Sally Carson, Jane Gilbert, Bill MacIntyre, and Lorraine Spiller
Year published: 
2013
Publication type: 
Research report
Publisher: 
NZCER
ISBN: 
978-1-927231-12-8
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Inspired by science

Author(s): 
A. Bull, J. Gilbert, H. Barwick, R. Hipkins, and R. Baker
Year published: 
2010
Publication type: 
Research report
Publisher: 
NZCER for the Royal Society of New Zealand and the Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor
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PISA and the progress question

Blog post: How to measure what we say we value

In the second in this blog series, Rose Hipkins takes on the challenge on thinking about how we might measure what we say we value.

By Rose Hipkins

In the first blog in this series I questioned the educational value of cobbling together reports of students’ progress in science from measures that lack coherence, such as a string of ‘unit’ tests. Instead, I suggested, we should think carefully about the sort of progress the curriculum indicates as important, and then ponder how we might measure that with at least some validity.

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What do we mean when we ask if students are "making progress" in science?

Blogpost: Rose Hipkins on student progress in science

In the first of a new series of blog posts, chief researcher Rose Hipkins asks what we mean when we ask if students are "making progress" in science.

Thank you for coming back to our science blog. You get a tag-team handover this week - I am Rose Hipkins and I’m picking up from my colleague Ally Bull. My plan is to build on her thoughts and questions while turning the focus to an issue that I know is worrying a lot of teachers right now. I’ll be musing about how we might determine if – and how - students are making progress in their science learning.

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Building creativity, innovation and increased critical science literacy

Blog post: creativity, innovation and increased critical science literacy

In the last in her series drawing on interviews done as part of the Competent Learners @ 25 project, Ally Bull asks what if the whole focus for primary school science was creative play.

This is the focus of A Nation of Curious Minds: He Whenua Hihiri i te Mahara – the national strategic plan for science in society. So to what extent does science learning at school support this goal? Before we can answer that we need to be clear about what supports the development of innovators. According to Tony Wagner the answer is play, passion and purpose. He says that in his interviews with highly innovative young people, their parents, teachers and mentors,  “passion” was the most frequently occurring word.

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Science fairs

Blog post: Rethinking school science fairs

In this blog post, Ally Bull makes the case for science fairs.

School science fairs get a bad rap. They are often criticised for not promoting real learning, being overly-competitive, advantaging students from already privileged backgrounds, putting extra stress on children, teachers and families, not representing science as it really is, and so on. Despite this though, some people do leave school with very positive memories of science fairs.

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Making school science personally relevant

Blog post: Making school science personally relevant

In the third of her series on the place of science in a future-focused curriculum, Ally Bull explores the idea of making school science personally relevant.

 

In the third of her series on the place of science in a future-focused curriculum, Ally Bull explores the idea of making school science personally relevant.

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Science and certainty

Blog post: science and certainty

In the second in her series on the place of science in a future-focused curriculum, Ally Bull explores the idea of science and certainty.

In the second in her series on the place of science in a future-focused curriculum, Ally Bull explores the idea of science and certainty.

Science is science regardless of how you approach it. That’s kind of the nice thing about science – it’s true regardless of how you feel about it.

There is always a right answer. English and the arts were a bit airy fairy for me. I really liked having an answer. It’s really satisfying.

I liked chemistry and maths because in those subjects you found the answer.

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