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Games for learning

Games for learning

Rachel's recommended reads, views, and listens (repost)

By Rachel Bolstad

Over the past two summers I've posted some recommendations for things to read, watch, listen to, or play if you're interested in games, gamification, and game design for learning.

 In case you missed them, here are my reposted 2018 and 2017 recommendations. If you've got something to recommend, let us know in the comments!

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Can conference participants gamify their own learning?

By Rachel Bolstad

This post is part of a short series to share highlights from NZCER's 2017 Games for Learning conference.

So you went to an inspiring conference. Now what?

Do you know this feeling? You go to a conference and get inspired. You fill your notebook with ideas, plans, and things to follow up on.  You can’t wait to go back to work to put some of your new thinking into practice and share these ideas with your colleagues.

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Game developers on an educational mission: Dan Milward and Maru Nihoniho

By Rachel Bolstad

This post is part of a short series to share highlights from NZCER's 2017 Games for Learning conference

As I noted in my last post, it’s not uncommon to find that people working in game development want to make a contribution to education.

But it’s one thing to aspire to this, and another thing to actually do it.

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James Everett on working in game design, and two ideas for discussion

By Rachel Bolstad

This post is part of a short series to share highlights from NZCER's 2017 Games for Learning conference.

Have you, or your students, ever imagined working in game design or another creative digital industry?

How do people find their way into this kind of work? What mix of skills, knowledge, and dispositions do you need to flourish in these fields?

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Yasmin Kafai on what students learn from making games

This post is part of a short series to share highlights from NZCER's 2017 Games for Learning conference

By Rachel Bolstad

Day 2 of the Games for Learning conference kicked off with a focus on “digital learning and game design”. One of the highlights for me was Yasmin Kafai’s talk, “Connected gaming: What making video games can teach us about learning and literacy”. Here's the full video of Yasmin’s talk.

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Bron Stuckey on rethinking who (and what) makes a game educational

Dr Bron Stuckey was the final speaker on the first day of the Games for Learning conference.  She drew on her extensive knowledge of game-based (and gameful) learning to distill what she called her “five big a-has” for educators.

By Rachel Bolstad

This post is part of a short series to share highlights from NZCER's 2017 Games for Learning conference.

Dr Bron Stuckey was the final speaker on the first day of the Games for Learning conference.  She drew on her extensive knowledge of game-based (and gameful) learning to distill what she called her “five big a-has” for educators.

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Exploring and extending culture through games: Amy Fredeen on Never Alone

Amy Fredeen was the second featured speaker on the first day of the 2017 Games for Learning conference. Following on from Harko Brown’s talk on ngā taonga tākaro,  Amy’s talk brought further riches to the morning’s theme of indigenous perspectives on games for learning.

By Rachel Bolstad

This post is part of a short series to share highlights from NZCER's 2017 Games for Learning conference.

Amy Fredeen was the second featured speaker on the first day of the 2017 Games for Learning conference. Following on from Harko Brown’s talk on ngā taonga tākaro,  Amy’s talk brought further riches to the morning’s theme of indigenous perspectives on games for learning.

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Four things I learned about ngā tākaro (games) from Harko Brown

Harko Brown was the first featured speaker at the 2017 Games for Learning conference.  We invited Harko to share his knowledge of ngā taonga tākaro, traditional Māori games, and his perspectives on their relevance for education now and into the future.

By Rachel Bolstad

This post is the beginning of a short series to share highlights from NZCER's 2017 Games for Learning conference.

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